Review: A Taste of Blood and Wine

A Taste of Blood Wine by Freda Warrington

It’s becoming a tale as old as time. No… not Beauty and the Beast, but rather, Beauty and the Vamp. You know the one… Girl meets mysterious boy. Girl is resistant at first but becomes mesmerized by mysterious boy’s charms. Boy ends up being the princely undead. Love story ensues.

What I liked most about Freda Warrington’s take on this (encroachingly overused) theme is that she makes the traditional vampirical mythology her own. Which I don’t usually enjoy. But her alterations serve to enhance not only the story itself but the strength of her vampires. No wooden daggers or holy water can hurt these vamps. Neither can sunlight destroy them (or make them sparkle.)

Warrington also brings in a very untouched upon concept by exploring the origins of basic vampire existence and ultimate creation. As well as introducing some compelling religious debates. The existence of God and Satan in a world where vampires roam the earth.

Blood and Wine’s veritable ‘Edward” is a vampire named, Karl who comes to the Neville family in order to search out a way to destroy his own kind using science and laboratory studies.  Karl’s counterpart is Charlotte Neville. A quiet, reserved, ‘ugly duckling’ member of the Neville family. Always left in the shadow of her beautiful and charismatic sister. Charlotte and Karl embark on a very exciting journey to save one another and keep their love undead!

I’ve been dying to read a vampire/ human love story where the heroine doesn’t end up sacrificing her warm-blooded, human existence to become a murderous blood sucker. (Buffy never did!!!) Guess you’ll have to read this one to find out if she does or doesn’t! No spoilers here!

All in all this was a very enjoyable book!! I fully recommend giving it a read.

Thanks to Titan Books!

Read this:

Encounters of Sherlock Holmes

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If you enjoy any incarnation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s intrepid detective and his various exploits, you will enjoy ‘Encounters,’ a collection of tales about the quirky Sherlock.

The writing of each story is unique and yet the overarching tone of Doyle’s Sherlock remains intact. From his rapid violin playing to his overly quick wit.
Each story contains all the traits of the original Sherlock Holmes we know and love, but the writing is much more modern. More in line with the BBC’s Sherlock, starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman.

I was particularly fond of ‘The Post-Modern Prometheus’ by Nick Kyme. This story tells the tale of an encounter between Victor Frankenstein, his monster, and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde with Sherlock and Watson. It is fantastical and full of adventure.

This volume offers stories from authors: Mark Hodder, Mags L. Halliday, Cavan Scott, Nick Kyme, Paul Magrs, George Mann, Stuart Douglas, Eric Brown, Richard Dinnick, Kelly Hale, Stevie Lockley, Mark Wright, David Barnett and James Lovegrove.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading it and highly recommend it to both avid fans and mere admirers of Sherlock Holmes.

Read This: The Aylesford Skull

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If you’re like me, then perhaps you’d heard about the steampunk genre but didn’t know exactly what it was all about. Let me shed some light. Steampunk literature is a mixture of science fiction and fantasy set in the Victorian time period. With that in mind I dove into James P. Blaylock’s ‘Aylesford Skull.’

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This book begs to be read out loud and in a Brittish accent. The language is evocative and transports you into the world of Langdon St. Ives and his nemesis, Dr. Ignacio Narbondo. This book has murder and adventure. Kidnapping, mystery and mysticism.

After the famous Aylesford Skull is stolen by the nefarious Dr. Narbondo, Langston St. Ives begins to chase him from the country to the city in an effort to stop his plot.

To anyone who has never read steampunk literature, this is an excellent representation of the genre and a great place to start.

The Aylesford Skull’ is available as of Jan. 15th from Titan Books.